.family. · kellan robert · sewing

still pregnant

Hard to believe, but true. We had our last ultrasound almost 2 weeks ago and finally got some size info. According to the fancy-schmancy ultrasound software, NB measured above the 95th percentile in every measurement and was estimated to weigh…wait for it…8lbs-12oz. That’s 8lbs-12oz two weeks ago.

new baby

We still don’t know the gender of NB, but I’m pretty sure I just ensured us another boy. See I’ve been crazy about the ruffles and the pink and the bonnets and the booties and basically all things girlie. So I finally scratched the itch and hit the sewing machine hard.

seersucker layette

Is it too much? It’s too much, isn’t it? It all started with the bonnet…

Simplicity 3840 baby bonnet  simplicity 3840 baby bonnet  simplicity 3840 baby bonnet

Irresistible, right? It’s Simplicity 3840 and I had to. I rarely buy Simplicity patterns as the few I’ve tried haven’t come together well. But, well, look how cute! This is view F. It’s made with some pink and white striped seersucker that I had laying around (I have no idea why I had pink and white seersucker in my stash.) and some newly purchased white seersucker. The white fabric was fused to the pink and then raw edge appliquéd using the blanket stitch setting on Curvy.  Though the pattern didn’t call for it, I edge-stitched the assembled bonnet (while still flat) using the stretch stitch. The ties are fabric rather than the ribbon called for in the pattern and the buttons were made with a Dritz Cover Button kit.

bitty bootiesAlas, even the sticky cuteness of the bonnet wasn’t enough, so I moved on to booties. Heather Bailey’s Bitty Booties, to be exact.  These were made with 2 layers of seersucker rather than the called for wool felt. They require more hand sewing than machine and once again, the buttons were made with a Dritz Cover Button kit. The button loop is a hair elastic. Those things are sooo useful. And the trim at the top is whip-stitched perle cotton.

frayed ruffle buttBut what about ruffles? Who doesn’t love ruffles? On to the ruffle butt onsie… This was to be the pièce de résistance. The pinnacle of baby girl fashion. Foot after foot of 1-1/2 inch seersucker marched through my ruffler, set at 1 pleat per stitch and a stitch length of 4.

Aside: I now recognize that my life before the ruffler was empty and meaningless.

9 (or maybe 10) rows of ruffles were then attached to the butt of the onsie as shown in Fireflies and Jellybeans tutorial. The edges of the ruffles were left raw, for some fraying. I loved this onsie…then I put it through the wash. Funny thing about seersucker, it gets super crinkly and tightens up A LOT, despite having been pre-washed and dried. So, the ruffles shrunk up and looked awful and the world was a bleak and gray place.

Then I spent 20 minutes ironing the business end of a onsie, ruffle by ruffle, which is totally going to happen every time the onsie is washed. It looks ok now, but learn from my mistake – don’t use seersucker for little ruffles.

Anyway, since the ruffle butt was a complete catastrophe (good thing pregnancy hormones aren’t making me melodramatic), I needed another piece to complete the set. Enter the skirted onsie.

skirted onsie  waistband detail

Basically, I ran a wide piece of seersucker folded in half through the ruffler and attached a waistband then sewed the top of the waisband to the onsie. Here’s the step-by-step.

  1. Waistband – Cut a 3″ wide strip of fabric long enough to encircle the onsie plus 1/2″ seam allowance and sew short edges together to form a tube.
  2. Skirt – Cut a strip a strip of fabric twice the desired length of the skirt and the full width of your fabric.
  3. Fold the fabric in half, right sides together and ruffle. Be sure to leave long threads for adjusting the gather.
  4. Tweak the gathering until the ruffle length matches the waistband, plus 1/2″ seam allowance.
  5. Open the edges of the ruffle about an inch and sew into a tube. Adjust the gather at the seam.
  6. Match the skirt seam and the waistband seam and sew the skirt to the waistband. The right side of the waistband should be facing the inside of the skirt.
  7. Fold the waistband in half and fold in the remaining edge. Then attach to the front of the skirt using a decorative machine stitch.
  8. Finally, attach the top of the waistband to the onsie.

Loose instructions, I know. Best I can do though, ’cause I winged the whole thing.

Sheesh, what a chatty post. Enjoy your day.

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3 thoughts on “still pregnant

  1. oh girl. i do hope you have a girl.
    tutus, bows and girlie cardis.
    i hope it happens for you. i really do.

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